October 8, 2015

April 7, 2015

How to Decode a Travel Brochure

Travel expert Rick Steves shares insider tips on cutting through the clutter of travel brochures.

  • Kathleen Squires
  • Be skeptical when reading travel brochures, because they are designed to help you spend money. They're propaganda—paid advertising—for a business.
  • Look for a straightforward, up-front price. (It's better than having the tour company trying to pry money out of you over the course of your vacation through various sales gimmicks.)
  • Keep in mind that a brochure is designed to make the place look really good. If it's not showing me a wide shot of a hotel, I assume that the wide shot is ugly. If it's just showing me the garden in the back, that means the front is ugly.
  • With hotels, words like "deluxe," "luxury," and "Superior" (along with a checklist of facilities, like a shoe-shine machine in your hallway) do nothing to quantify the character, ambiance, friendliness, and convenience of the place.
  • The word "area" should send a red flag: If the brochure says your hotel is in the "Florence area," right away you know it's halfway to Bologna in the middle of nowhere.
  • If you're taking a tour of some kind, keep in mind that the more sights that are packed into a short tour, the more time you're spending on a bus and the less time you're spending seeing them.
  • Bragging that a place is a member of the local tourist board may mean only that it paid to be included. Similarly, if a place points out that it is  on UNESCO's World Heritage List, they have nothing else to talk about

July 29, 2014


Drive I-95 : Exit by Exit Info, Maps, History and Trivia

Drive I-95 offers easy-to-follow 30-mile color maps providing mile-by-mile overviews of the road ahead. These help you quickly locate upcoming services on each side of the road going North or South. The maps and the fun stories of the road are useful for family travelers, seniors, salesmen, truckers, campers and RVers, University students and their parents, military personnel and people who live and work near I-95
 Interstate 95 is America's Main Street, stretching from Maine to Miami. It is the U.S.'s busiest highway, with 75,000,000 people living and working along the route, and it journeys though 7 of America's major cities: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington D.C., Jacksonville and Miami.There is so much to see along the way that one of our fans wrote, Drive I-95 "makes your road trip a vacation unto itself. It mentions many un-advertised and curious stops along the way."

January 13, 2014

Day Trips from New York City: Getaway Ideas for the Local Traveler

Rediscover the simple pleasure of a day trip with Day Trips from New York City. This guide is packed with hundreds of exciting things for vacationers to do, see and discover within a two-hour drive of the New York metro area.

September 30, 2013

Trips for Lit Lovers

Off the Beaten Page encourages avid readers, particularly those in book clubs and other groups, to leave the security of their living rooms and seek to experience in person the places they’ve read about. Inspired by years of excursions with her own book club, award-winning journalist Terri Peterson Smith offers lively, expert guidance through fifteen US destinations ideal for anyone eager to mix their love of travel and quality time with friends or family with their desire for meaningful cultural experiences.

Walking New York: The Best of the City

Presents itineraries for fifteen walking tours in Manhattan, with descriptions of the attractions located along each route; information about the history, architecture, and culture of the city; maps; and photographs.

July 23, 2013

Kayaking Long Island

 Paddling Long Island is the only book on the market to depict routes and destinations across the whole of Long Island and the New York City area. And it showcases 50 of the very best. It is a diverse selection, too. After all, according to skill level, weather, personal mood, and other factors, a paddler may want open, fast water one day, but a quiet, protected experience at another time, and something in-between later on. It’s all here, from New York City to the far eastern tip of Long Island’s Montauk Point.